Monday, January 25, 2016

Grassland prescribed burn will take place tomorrow

Fire managers on the Crooked River National Grassland plan to burn about 68 acres of slash piles along Highway 26 near the base of Grizzly Mountain starting tomorrow morning at 10 am.
This is the same burn project that firefighters attempted two weeks ago, but it was cancelled due to snow and rain. Managers are hoping to complete the burn tomorrow before predicted rain arrives later this week.
The juniper slash is left over from a thinning project and commercial firewood sale along the southern boundary of the Grassland, near Mile Post 16, about 8 miles northwest of Prineville.
Objectives for the burn are simply to remove leftover juniper slash material so land managers can reseed the area with native grasses.
Light smoke will be visible for one day during active ignitions, but is not expected to impact the highway or passing motorists.
Fuels specialists follow policies outlined in the Oregon Smoke Management Plan, which governs prescribed fires (including pile burning) and attempts to minimize impacts to visibility and public health.
Fire managers are planning this burn in coordination with Crook County Fire and Rescue and in observance of the weather and applicable air quality advisories.

The Forest and Grassland appreciate public tolerance of temporary smoke conditions in support of this work.

Tuesday, January 12, 2016

Crooked River National Grassland burning is cancelled due to weather

A planned 68-acre slash burning project on the Crooked River National Grassland has been cancelled due to winter weather.

Fire managers had hoped for a burning window today to remove juniper slash left over from a commercial firewood sale last year.

Weather conditions are too cold and wet to undertake the project today. Managers will look for another opportunity to carry out the project over the coming weeks.

The project area is located about 8 miles northwest of Prineville near Milepost 16 on Hwy 26, at the base of Grizzly Mountain.

Thursday, January 7, 2016

Juniper slash burn planned next week near Grizzly Mountain

Fire managers on the Crooked River National Grassland plan to burn about 68 acres of slash piles along Highway 26 near the base of Grizzly Mountain early next week as weather conditions allow.

The juniper slash is left over from a thinning project and commercial firewood sale along the southern boundary of the Grassland, near Mile Post 16, about 8 miles northwest of Prineville.

Objectives for the burn are simply to remove leftover juniper slash material so land managers can reseed the area with native grasses.

Light smoke will be visible for one day during active ignitions, but is not expected to impact the highway or passing motorists.

Fuels specialists follow policies outlined in the Oregon Smoke Management Plan, which governs prescribed fires (including pile burning) and attempts to minimize impacts to visibility and public health.

Fire managers are planning this burn in coordination with Crook County Fire and Rescue and in observance of the weather and applicable air quality advisories.


The Forest and Grassland appreciate public tolerance of temporary smoke conditions in support of this work.

Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Pile Burning Continues in West Bend

BEND– Beginning today and continuing through the week, fuels specialists plan to burn 167 acres of piles near Dillion Falls west of Bend.

The units to be burned are approximately five miles west of Dillion Falls and are concentrations of leftover woody debris associated with previous vegetation management activities intended to remove hazardous fuels that can burn during summer wildfires. No road or trail closures are anticipated with this burning.

Open flames may be present for up to a day and smoke and steam could remain in the area for over a week. The public is reminded to not attempt to extinguish these piles if they see smoke or flame. Fuels specialists will be monitoring these sites until all piles are declared out.  

The units west of Bend can be viewed via the West Bend Interactive map here: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/webmaps/deschutes/west-bend/
 
However, if smoke drifts on to roads, motorists should slow down, turn on headlights, and proceed with care. 

Fuels specialists follow policies outlined in the Oregon Department of Forestry smoke management plan, which governs prescribed fires (including pile burning) and attempts to minimize impacts to visibility and public health.


For more information, visit the Deschutes website at www.fs.usda.gov/deschutes and follow us on twitter @CentralORFire.  

Friday, November 13, 2015

Pile Burning Planned for Next Week Outside of Sisters



SISTERS– Taking advantage of the cooler weather, fuels specialists plan to burn nearly 200 acres of slash piles next week within approximately one mile of Camp Sherman and within the Glaze Forest Restoration area.

Beginning as early as Monday and continuing through the week, fuels specialists are planning to burn three units of piles totaling 44 acres within the Glaze Forest Restoration project area south of Highway 20 and west of Cold Springs Cutoff/Forest Road 1012. An additional five units totaling 153 acres are slated for burning in the Metolius area within approximately one mile of Camp Sherman. 

Piles may smolder, burn, and produce smoke for several days after ignition.  While smoke may linger in the area, there is a real benefit to burning this type of vegetation.  The piles are concentrations of leftover materials associated with previous vegetation management activities intended to remove hazardous fuels that can burn during summer wildfires. 

No closures are anticipated with these operations.  However, if smoke drifts on to roads, motorists should slow down, turn on headlights, and proceed with care.  Once ignited, units are monitored by firefighters until they are declared out.

Fuels specialists follow policies outlined in the Oregon Department of Forestry smoke management plan, which governs prescribed fires (including pile burning) and attempts to minimize impacts to visibility and public health.


For more information, visit the Deschutes website at www.fs.usda.gov/deschutes and follow us on twitter @CentralORFire.  

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Pile Burning Begins on the Deschutes National Forest


Central Oregon–As fall weather brings more moisture, shorter days, and cooler temperatures, fuels specialists are beginning to burn piles across the Deschutes National Forest. 

Starting today and continuing through the next several weeks and months depending on conditions, specialists will begin burning a variety of units across the forest.

Piles may smolder, burn, and produce smoke for several days after ignition.  While smoke may linger in the area, there is a real benefit to burning this type of vegetation.  The piles are concentrations of leftover materials associated with previous vegetation management activities intended to remove hazardous fuels that can burn during summer wildfires. 

No closures are anticipated with these operations.  However, if smoke drifts on to roads, motorists should slow down, turn on headlights, and proceed with care.  Once ignited, units are monitored by firefighters until they are declared out.

Fuels specialists follow policies outlined in the Oregon Department of Forestry smoke management plan, which governs prescribed fires (including pile burning) and attempts to minimize impacts to visibility and public health.

For more information, visit the Deschutes website at www.fs.usda.gov/deschutes and follow us on twitter @CentralORFire. 



-End-

Monday, October 26, 2015

Ochoco prescribed burns cancelled; pile burning instead

PRINEVILLE, Ore. – Due to the precipitation received over the weekend, fire managers on the Ochoco National Forest have cancelled plans for prescribed burning near Spears Meadow and near Black Canyon Wilderness. They will resume burning hand piles along Forest Road 22 near Walton Lake instead.

Firefighters were able to accomplish about 600 acres of prescribed burning last week in the Willow Pine burn units, located in the southeast corner of the National Forest, about five miles south of Frazier campground near Porcupine and Sunflower creeks.

 This week they will resume burning hand piles along Forest Road 22, between Ochoco Ranger Station and Walton Lake.

The piles are left over from a mechanical thinning project to reduce hazardous fuels and fire danger along the popular route. Piles created from this type of treatment are allowed to dry for one to two years to reduce smoke emissions and increase consumption of piled material.

Light smoke will be visible during ignition periods but will be short in duration. Prescribed fire signs will be placed along the road. Burning will continue as long as weather and fuel conditions allow.

All prescribed burning is proposed, analyzed, and planned ahead of time by the Forest Service as part of restoration and fuels management projects. Fuels specialists follow policies outlined in the Oregon Smoke Management Plan, which governs prescribed fires (including pile burning) and attempts to minimize impacts to visibility and public health.


For more information, visit the Ochoco National Forest website at www.fs.usda.gov/ochoco and follow us on Twitter @CentralORFire, or visit our interactive prescribed fire map online at http://go.usa.gov/3hkwJ